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Cindy Pitts Gilbert: “Introduction to 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace”

Cindy Pitts Gilbert spoke to the Rotary Club of Lawrenceville on Monday, July 25 about the Five Languages of Appreciation.  The Five Languages are based on Dr. Gary Chapman’s work on the Five Love Languages.  The basic philosophy of the love/appreciation languages is that everyone has a preferred style of showing appreciation and receiving it, and when there is a mismatch between two people’s styles, conflict and misunderstandings arise.  Anyone can learn their appreciation language by taking the MBA Inventory, which requires a paid access code.  You can discover your love language through this quick, free inventory.

 

Cindy noted that 79% of people who leave jobs say they left due to lack of appreciation and 65% of workers say they haven’t experienced appreciation at work in the past year.  This leads to a lack of engagement, poor work relationships, and decreased job satisfaction.  The five languages are:

  • gifts
  • quality time
  • words of affirmation
  • acts of service
  • physical touch.

 

Appreciation is an often-overlooked leadership skill.  Understanding your team’s appreciation languages will help build better work relationships and increase job satisfaction.

2016 RCL End of Year Party

The Rotary Club of Lawrenceville held their annual summer party at the 1818 Club on June 30.  With pleasant music, a delicious buffet, and good fellowship, members enjoyed their evening.  Pictured are 1) Richard Steele, Warren Davis, David Freeman, and Linda Shephard sharing a laugh at dinner, 2) Kim Nelson receiving her Rotarian of the Year Award, and 3) members receiving their Certificates of Appreciation for the good work done this year.

Marjorie Treu: Millennials in the Workplace–Myths, Characteristics, and Strengths

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Program speaker for the day was Marjorie Treu, a motivational speaker focusing on advice to business managers and human resource officers about communicating across the various generations among their employees.  She opened with questions which located Rotarians in their specific generation:  Baby Boomers, Generation X, Gen Y (or Millennials), or Gen Z.  She focused on communication issues and how Millennials, specifically, differ from earlier generations.  She debunked five myths about them: 1) they are the most self-involved generation, 2) they have tiny attention spans, 3) they want constant attention and are used to all on a team getting trophies, 4) they can’t make a decision without everyone weighing in, and 4) they are most likely to jump ship if expectations are not met.  She then focused on major characteristics of this largest generation in history: they are well-educated with women outpacing men, are technologically savvy, are civic minded, and see themselves as global citizens.  She called on the group to list other characteristics and strengths of Millennials.